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About English Language

Overview Of English Language

About

Vision

We aspire to achieve distinction and leadership in the field of teaching English language, its literature, linguistics and translation, locally, regionally and globally.

 

Mission

To enhance the students' educational, cultural and intellectual levels to meet the demands of the market; to prepare outstanding graduates and researchers capable of offering community service; to prepare capable of coping with the new trends through scientific research, developing the society and through encouraging dialogue, understanding and communication between cultures and civilizations.

 

Objectives

  1. To develop students' linguistic and communicative skills through the most recent facilities and equipment.

  2. To provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of English, its literature, linguistics and translation.

  3. To conduct theoretical, experimental and comparative research studies in English, its literature, linguistics and translation.

  4. To develop students' critical and creative thinking.

  5. To teach students the applications of modern technology in the fields of English, linguistics and translation.

  6. To establish a partnership with the private and public sectors through conducting studies and providing consultation.

  7. To encourage critical understanding of the English speaking nations' thoughts and cultures and to open channels of contact and discussions with these nations.

 

College’s Programs

Bachelor Program

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  • Study Plan :

     

    First Level

    First Semester

    Second Semester

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    T

    P

    Total

    T

    P

    Total

    Arabic Language (1)

    2

     

    0

    2

    Arabic Language (2)

    2

    0

    2

    Islamic Culture (1)

    2

    0

    2

    Islamic Culture (2)

    2

    0

    2

    Grammar (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Grammar (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Reading (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Reading (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Vocabulary Study (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Vocabulary Study (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Speaking/Listening (1)

    1

    2

    3

    Speaking/Listening (2)

    1

    2

    3

    Total

    14

    2

    16

    Total

    14

    2

    16

    Second Level

    First Semester

    Second Semester

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    T

    P

    Total

    T

    P

    Total

    Introduction to Computer

    1

    1

    2

    Library Science

    2

    0

    2

    Arabic Language (3)

    2

    0

    2

    Contemporary Islamic Issues

    2

    0

    2

    Writing (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Elizabethan Drama

    3

    0

    3

    Survey of English Lit. (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Survey of English Lit. (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Grammar (3)

    3

    0

    3

    Introduction to Linguistics

    3

    0

    3

    Study Skills

    3

    0

    3

    Writing (3)

    3

    0

    3

    Total

    15

    1

    16

    Total

    16

    0

    16

    Third Level

    First Semester

    Second Semester

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    T

    P

    Total

    T

    P

    Total

    Linguistics (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Linguistics (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Writing (3)

    3

    0

    3

    Short Stories

    3

    0

    3

    18th & 19th Century Novel

    3

    0

    3

    19th Century Poetry

    3

    0

    3

    Non-fictional Prose

    3

    0

    3

    Psycholinguistics

    3

    0

    3

    Sociolinguistics

    3

    0

    3

    Research Methods (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Research Methods (1)

    3

    0

    3

    Translation (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Total

    18

    0

    18

    Total

    18

    0

    18

    Fourth Level

    First Semester

    First Semester

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    Credit Hours

    T

    P

    Total

    T

    P

    Total

    20th Century American Lit. (1)

    3

    0

    3

    20th Century American Lit. (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Advanced Composition

    3

    0

    3

    20th Century Novel

    3

    0

    3

    20th Century Poetry

    3

    0

    3

    Discourse Analysis

    3

    0

    3

    Applied Linguistics

    3

    0

    3

    20th Century Drama

    3

    0

    3

    Translation (2)

    3

    0

    3

    Translation (3)

    3

    0

    3

    Practice & Theory of Lit. Criticism

    3

    0

    3

    Graduate Project Writing

    3

    0

    3

    Total

    18

    0

    18

    Total

    18

    0

    18

     

     

  • Description of Courses :

    Reading (1) & (2)

    This course concentrates on the development of reading skills, specifically skills pertinent to students in a university environment: aspects of information retrieval, ascertaining the subject or purpose of a text, using context to infer meaning of words, phrases and larger text segments. Texts will be in areas pertinent to areas of specialization in the college: social sciences, languages and general culture.

    Speaking & Listening (1) & (2)

    It is an intermediate level course, which concentrates on the development of students’ listening & speaking skills. It focuses on the comprehension of auditory output. As such, the course develops listening comprehension of a number of varieties of English as used in real life situations. The emphasis is on oral comprehension in academic settings: lectures, note-taking, and reproducing content after listening. Conversational English, dialogues and debates are also included.

    Grammar (1). (2) & (3)

    Three courses on English grammar to cover different aspects of sentence structure in English including subject-verb agreement, the noun phrase, the verb phrase (tense and aspect, Model auxiliaries) and gerunds and infinitives. The course focuses on exercises including meaningful drills based on ordinary everyday language. Development of motor skills that incorporate English structure is highlighted.

    Vocabulary Study

    This course is designed to enhance students’ knowledge of the English language. Students will gain a larger word stock, knowledge of word formation processes, spelling patterns, and how to articulate and pronounce words correctly.

    Introduction to Linguistics

    This course surveys the main topics of General Linguistics. It starts from discussion of the general properties of human language and moves on to introduce the main levels of linguistic analysis: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax and Grammar, Semantics and Pragmatics. It also relates recent developments in Pragmatics, Sociolinguistics, Psycholinguistics and Discourse analysis to the general theory of language.

    Survey of British literature (1) & (2)

    Two courses that trace the cultural revolution as it spread from Italy to other parts of the European continent and finally to England. Topics will include the Reformation, social and political conduct, and the intellectual and literary movements up to 20th century. The courses provide an introduction to the literary genres of the century, mainly poetry & drama .There will be a survey of Renaissance author, examining selected literary texts in their historical contexts ,example Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster, Spencer, Wyatt and Surrey .

    Elizabethan Drama

    This course aims at giving the students an idea about the drama of the Elizabethan period. The course includes the works of Marlow as a precursor of Shakespeare with a detailed study of his play Doctor Faustus, besides Shakespeare, is to be introduced through his major plays. The Merchant of Venice is to be taught in detail.

    Study Skills

    This course is designed to focus on a set of skills needed for self-study: understanding and interpreting writing texts and non-verbal information such as charts, diagrams, graphs and flow charts, understanding lectures on subjects related to students' field of study.

    Writing (1). (2) & (3)

    “Writing” is three courses that provide the student with practice in English writing skills from the sentence to the paragraph level. It deals with basic aspects: handwriting, punctuation, capitalization…, as well as text development from simple to compound/complete sentences and on to paragraph formation.

    Linguistics (1)

    This course aims to provide students with a detailed account of three major areas of linguistics, namely Phonetics, Phonology & Morphology.

    18th & 19th Century Novel

    This course aims at assisting students in developing a critical awareness of novels during the 18th & 19th centuries. To familiarize students with the 18th century novel, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe will be studied in detail. On the other hand, Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights or Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice will be taught as a sample of the fiction during the first half of the 19th century and a novel written by Dickens or Hardy.

    Non-fictional Prose

    The course in non-fiction aims at enriching the awareness of students of how major authors of English prose make use of stylistic devices to communicate their viewpoints. The course will include Bacon's "Of Studies", "Of Truth" together with Donne's "Devotion", an extract from Mathew Arnold "Culture and Anarchy" and C.P. Snow's The Two Cultures”.

    Sociolinguistics

    The course introduces sociolinguistics, the study of the relationship between language and society. In exploring this dynamic relationship, key concepts in
    sociolinguistics such as language, dialect, accent, speech community and code switching.

    Research Methodology (1) & (2)

    Research Methodology aims at preparing students for designing & carrying small-scale research projects in the areas of linguistics, language studies and literature. It deals with methodological problems in humanities ranging from empiricism to Ethno methodology and hermeneutics. In addition, it covers experimental design, sampling and data collection in various types of corpora. The course also covers research techniques and styles such as the APA & MLA referencing styles.

    Linguistics (2)

    This course aims to provide students with a detailed account of three major areas of linguistics, namely Syntax, Semantics & Pragmatics.

    Pre-Romantic 19th Century Poetry

    The aim of the course is to familiarize the students with the main developments in English literature up to the romantic age. The course starts with Chaucer who is considered the first English poet and includes Sydney, Spencer, major dramatists of the Elizabethan period, Milton's poetry, the restoration comedy and the Augustan age.

    Translation (1)

    Translation 1” introduces the main approaches to the theory and practice in translation. It covers psychological, socio-cultural, linguistic and hermeneutic theories of translation. It briefly treats the rising field of Translation Studies, Machine Translation and computer-aided translation. The course provides coverage of methodological issues and techniques relevant to the practical courses that follow.

    Short Stories

    The versatility of the short story makes it, indeed, a genre that accommodates diverse subjects, narrative techniques and cultural contexts calling for variegated approaches. Both American and European short stories make the material of the course. The brevity of the short story fosters a relatively comprehensive reading that involves a hermeneutical process attends to the meaning of the work and a theoretical address to the meaning as well. A minimum of six short stories are to be covered.

    Psycholinguistics

    This course aims to introduce the students to the field Psycholinguistics. It provides them with general information and issues on how language is produced, comprehended, acquired and represented in the brain. It also focuses on some methods which are employed by psycholinguists to probe language representation and processing in the mind, the correspondence of theoretical linguistics and language processing, and Level’s model of language production.

    19th Century American Literature

    The course offers a brief introductory survey concentrating on major writers, works, trends and genres. The course examines the major literary movements of: Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism and ending with the Harlem Renaissance. At least one novel, one play, and a collection of poems to be closely studied of the works of writers such as Longfellow, Poe, Howthorne, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, James, Frost, O’Neill, Hemingway, O’Connor, Stevens, Hughes, Cullen, Wright, and others.

    20th Century Novel

    A survey of British fiction in the 20th century will be provided with consideration to the new developments regarding the genre during this period. Aspects of modern fiction that deal with the fragmentation of the moral and spiritual values and its effect on the form and the content of the novel will be stressed.

    20th Century Drama

    This course examines Western drama, from the middle of the nineteenth century through the Second World War, which aspired to new levels of theatrical and social realism and then experimented with piercing the boundaries of the realism it had achieved. It is a study of mainly European and British modern and avant-garde drama in the period from Ibsen to the present, including a close reading and analysis of a selection from the following playwrights and the dramatic schools they represent: Ibsen, Chekhov, Yeats, Syng, Eliot, Beckett & Osborne.

    20th Century Poetry

    The aim of this course is to develop in the students a critical awareness of the significant linguistic, emotive and attitudinal trends in modern poetry. The course content will include poems by Yeats, Auden, Eliot, Dylan Thomas, Larkin and Ted Hughes.

    Discourse Analysis

    The course introduces students to the analysis of naturally connected discourse, spoken and written by providing them with some theoretical basis (i.e. exposing students to the different approaches to the analysis of the communicative functions of language), and more importantly providing students with tools to analyze a wide variety of discourse types.

    Literary Criticism

    This course is composed of a selection of literary texts to be given to the students for analysis. Students should be able to apply the literary theories they have studied to those text.

    Applied Linguistics

    This course covers the main areas of applying linguistic knowledge in specific professions, particularly language learning & teaching. It concentrates mainly on providing a comprehensive picture of the theoretical foundations of language learning and teaching as well as information about ELT methods and techniques. The course also provides students with information about the different linguistic & non-linguistic factors that might affect L2 learning.

    20th Century American Literature

    This course includes Scott Fitzgerald's the Great Gatsby or Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, and some poems by Robinson, Frost and Sylvia Path and a play (like O’Neill’s the Hairy Ape), which embodies some of the characteristic features of 20th century drama.

    Translation (2)

    Translation II (Arabic-English/ English-Arabic)”: focuses on practice in translating four main text-types: Media (especially first page newspaper articles), business and finance, the language of advertisements, and academic articles. From the media newspaper front-page articles are selected; from the world of business, the emphasis is on business news and reports, bank forms and leaflets, and companies and stock news and reviews. From academic research articles, the abstracts are practiced.

    Advanced Composition

    The course develops creative writing in students. They should be trained in the art of writing on topics of descriptive, narrative, literary, and cultural nature in a lucid and clear way to bring out the main thrust of their argument in an effective manner.

    Project Writing

    The Graduation Project is a course which makes use of previous course in terms of application of methodology and content. Students are going to choose one of the three main domains (language, translation or literature) to work on and produce project under supervision. The choice is guided by the student’s performance in previous courses. The project can be based on work or field experience (depending on availability) or on research relevant to the student’s orientation and future work.

     

Master Program

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  • Study Plan :

    MA of Arts in Linguistics and English Language Studies

    Requirements

     * Successfully pass preparatory year courses and obtain the grade point average stipulated in the postgraduate regulations of HU.

    * Successfully pass the scientific thesis discussion according to HU regulations.

    Study plan

     

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    15

    Postgraduate Foundation Module in English language studies

    15

    Postgraduate Foundation Module in Linguistic studies

    6

    Dissertation

    36

    Total

     

    First Year  

    First semester

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    3

    Linguistic Foundations: Sounds of Language

    3

    Linguistic Foundations: Structures of Language

    2

    Linguistic Foundations: Meanings of Language

    2

    Research Methodology

    3

    Postgraduate Foundation Module in Literature

    2

    Graduate Seminars

    15

    Total

     Second semester

    Credit Hours

    Course Title

    3

    Psycholinguistics

    3

    Sociolinguistics

    2

    Theory and Practice of Literary Criticism

    2

    Language and Literacy

    3

    Literary Linguistics

    2

    Multicultural Literature

    15

    Total

     

    Second Year

    The second year is devoted to the preparation of the thesis project according to HU regulations.

  • Description of Courses :

    Linguistic Foundations: Sounds of Language

    This course is designed as two overlapping modules – Module 1: Phonetics and Module 2: Phonology. The course will introduce students to the physiological aspects of speech production. It will also explore processes of articulation, phonation and intonation in English and other selected languages, revise concepts of phoneme, features, abstractness, ordering and examine theories of lexical, metrical, auto-segmental dependence and government phonology, with emphases on analytical procedures and applications to real world language problems.

    Linguistic Foundations: Structures of Language

    This course deals with the principles of morphology and syntax with emphases on analytical procedures and applications to real world language problems. It introduces grammatical principles that govern the structure of words (morphology) and sentences (syntax) in human languages around the world. The aim of the course is to develop the student’s appreciation for both the variation found in human languages and the essential unity underlying that variation, and to strengthen his/her skills in analytic reasoning through the study of linguistic patterns. Lectures, assignments and tests will use examples from English as well as other languages.

    Linguistic Foundations: Meanings of Language

    This module focuses on the principles of semantics and pragmatics with emphases on analytical procedures and applications to real world language problems. Meaning in isolation and meaning according to the context and according to the speaker's attention and the hearer's understanding will be dealt with in this course. Linguistic semantics is the study of meaning as conveyed through language. The utterances made by speakers of a language are expressions of intentional and mindful activity. Communication through language is a reflection of our modeling of the environment and our attempt to understand reality with innate logical machinery for reasoning and inference. We begin with the study of logic (natural deduction) and show how propositional and first-order logical systems provide a natural means for the formal interpretation of linguistic expressions. We then examine the semantic of logical inference in terms of model theory and semantic types. The major subject areas of semantics will be covered, including quantification and plurality, anaphora and discourse, tense and aspect, ellipsis, and lexical semantics.

    Psycholinguistics

    This course discusses the theories of learning and the major contemporary issues relating to the psychological foundations of language.  It deals with the behaviourists’ views on language acquisition especially the views of Skinner, Watson and Pavlov; the views of the cognitive psychologists such as Piaget and the cognitive-innateness hypothesis of linguists-cum-psychologists such as Chomsky, Slobin and McNeill.  It examines the second language learning theories of Krashen, Selinker and others.  It looks into human language processing including perception and production of speech and writing as well as the instrumental and integrative motivation towards language learning.

    Sociolinguistics

    This course seeks to examine the development and growth of Sociolinguistics as a field of study in the latter half of the Twentieth century. The following topics will be addressed:

    • The definition and scope of Sociolinguistics;
    • The definition and interpretation of basic concepts of theoretical importance in sociolinguistic research e.g. language-dialect, speech community, linguistic repertoire, linguistic variable, social variable, communicative competence, etc.;
    • The contributions of researchers such as Gumperz, Hymes, and Labov to developments in sociolinguistic theory.

    Language and Literacy

    This course explores current debates in the rapidly changing field of language and literacy, and examines the relevance of research and scholarship to educational policy and practice. Its international focus and emphasis on social perspectives will enable the student to gain a deeper understanding of language and literacy in use, and to learn methods of making his/her own analyses. Student will draw on concepts and methods from several disciplines, including linguistics, anthropology and psychology as well as educational research. The course will appeal to teachers and others interested in language and literacy issues from an educational perspective. Among the areas related to literacy are domains of literacy, academic literacy, gender and literacy, historical aspects of literacy and social aspects of literacy.

    This course features research and practice both within and beyond Yemen. The aims of the course are to:

    · Introduce current issues in the research field of language and literacy studies.

    · Familiarize the student with the relevant theoretical and methodological developments.

    · Enable the student to understand better the role of language in the processes of teaching and learning, especially in relation to teaching and learning about language.

    · Explore the relevance of research in the field of language and literacy studies to contemporary issues in both global and local contexts.

    · Show the student how to use a range of methods for researching and analyzing language and literacy.

    · Encourage the student to reflect critically on his/her understanding of language and literacy through discussion with other participants in the course.

    With an emphasis on social perspectives on language and literacy, the course covers themes in language and literacy studies such as language and social identity, the communicative processes of teaching and learning, literacy practices, access to literacy, and the uses of language with computer technology. Recent work is used to exemplify the different ways researchers investigate language and literacy practices in various educational contexts. The student will explore a range of language data, spoken, written and visual, and try out analyses for himself, completing a project on a topic that particularly interests him.

    Postgraduate Foundation Module in Literature

    This course will explore a range of recent theoretical approaches to the study of literature, and how these impact literary research. It will expose students to theoretical and critical issues related to literature. Using these critical frameworks will sensitize students to the ideological nature of literary discourse and the ways in which certain dominant ideas of nation, race, ethnicity and gender are ratified or challenged. Thus this course develops students’ ability to think, interpret and evaluate differing views and perspectives.

    Graduate Seminars

    The course is taught through tutorials (seminars).  The tutorial groups will meet once a week to work on contemporary issues (see list below), having previously been given a hand-out with suggested topics for discussion and recommended reading list.  One or more students in the group will present the chosen topic, which will be discussed by the group under the guidance of a lecturer.  The aim of this component of the M.A. course is firstly to introduce major issues in linguistics, applied linguistics, literacy and English literature which would complement those taught in the course component and secondly to give students practice in writing academic papers and sustaining linguistic argumentation. 

    The proposed course content will include:

    1.       Speech and writing

    2.       Grammar

    3.       Corpus Linguistics

    4.       Language and IT

    5.       Critical Discourse Analysis

    6.       Language Acquisition

    7.      Psycholinguistics and Sociolinguistics

    8.       Applied Linguistics

    9.       Literacy

    10.    English Literature

    Dissertation

    The dissertation course requires students to carry out research in linguistics or literature under the guidance of a supervisor. Students will use primary and secondary information and design their research study appropriately. They will hand in a complete dissertation consisting of 16000 – 18000 words at the end of the course.

       Theory and Practice of Literary Criticism

    This course included a discussion of the major theories of literary criticisms and its influences on creative writings and literary development including the development of English literary criticism theories. Reading and evaluation of selected texts based on the literary theories discussed. The uses and application of literary theories and criticism in learning and teaching of literature in schools will be explored. The students will be able to:

    a) Understand psychological, historical, biographical, formalist, feminist and postmodernist interpretations of literature.

    b) Apply various critical approaches to the same work of literature.

    c) Understand how various schools of criticism reflect social and historic conditions.

    Literary Linguistics

    This module will introduce students to some of the ways in which linguistic analysis can be used to explore the language of literary texts. Topics covered will include: nouns and verbs; sentence structure; vocabulary and register; narrative and point of view; reporting speech and thought. The emphasis will be upon a practical approach, and texts studied will be predominantly drawn from contemporary literature. Students will also be introduced to some of the recent debates about the value of literary linguistics. Students who complete this module will have gained a good understanding of the language of literature.

    This course introduces the student to a range of analytic techniques for a variety of text types, including prose fiction, poetry and drama. The student will develop a vocabulary for linguistic description and a repertoire of approaches to the analysis of literary texts. The student will also consider some recent developments in the study of literary linguistics, which came out of the desire for social and contextual analysis in the study of language. Here the focus is on the situation of production and the reception of texts and the student will discuss approaches including critical discourse analysis, cognitive poetics and text world theory, as well as various techniques of analysis based in the study of pragmatic stylistics.

    Multicultural Literature

    The Multicultural Literature course is an introduction to writing by people both from around the world and those living as minorities within Western culture. The curriculum concentrates on major novels, plays, poetry and essays written by those traditionally held outside the Western literary canon. The students will study the development of these literatures and the corresponding social and historical circumstances that helped shape them, as well as the social and political movements they helped to foster. This class will make students more aware of the differences that culture, ethnicity, class and gender have on the study of literature.

    Students will use the literature as a starting point for enhancing their reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and critical thinking skills.

     

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